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Table of Contents- Pride and Prejudice- Emma- Sense and Sensibility- Persuasion- Mansfield Park- Northanger Abbey- Lady Susan- Love And Friendship And Other Early WorksSearch a title: enter Forward2...

Title : The Complete Works of Jane Austen
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ISBN : 9781858131115
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 1098 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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The Complete Works of Jane Austen Reviews

  • Shaun Lyon
    2018-10-01 23:27

    Formatted very nicely. The electronic version controls work very well. Have found no glitches. Which are very nice. It also is a complete collection of Austen's works. All for very cheap! Really very happy with this purchase. Worth every penny and more. I bought this book at special price from here:https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Works...

  • Joanne Dorfman
    2018-09-19 19:41

    I have ready every Jane Austen book at least ten times. I never get tired of them.

  • midnightfaerie
    2018-10-19 01:38

    This book, The Complete Works of Jane Austen, is not to be confused with The Newly Discovered, Unfinished, & Finished Complete Works of Jane Austen. The first, which I have completed, contains only the larger, more popular novels that Austen is known for, while the other contains those novels along with many smaller obscure novels, novellas, poems, and letters. I have finished the major books, and am now working my way through the smaller ones.As for my opinion on Austen:As I work my way through the works of Jane Austen I find myself with manner of speech slightly affected and by no means convinced that Miss Jane Austen could be anything other than a classicist of the highest order. Here is my list of reasons forthwith that hath convinced me (that's a little Shakespeare influence creeping in, which I'm also reading):1. Austen's manner of writing has bewitched me like no other. Her phrasing and intimate knowledge of propriety of the time period make her as unique as social virtues amoung the maids of a manor. 2. Then there's the length of time she's been around. The fortitude of her writing has helped her persevere through the duration of years since having first written the novels. 3. The magic factor is evident throughout her work and is evident alone in the number of story adaptations of her works out there. 4. When looking at her methods of form, it is said she was the beginning of the movement from neo-classicism to romanticism. So for this I think we can loosely put her into the category of introducing a new style of writing. 5. I think it almost need not be mentioned that Miss Austen has a huge following. I only pause a moment on it here to continue its course of perpetual provocation. 6. Because she is one believed to have begun the period change to Romanticism, it can therefore be concluded that she was looked on to be one of the first and an expert in the field. At the very least one to which all others might have been compared to. 7. Educators teach Austen because they find her easy to learn, familiar, and non-controversial. However, because of this she is taught often. And because she is taught often there has been some discourse as to her even being taught at all. Some have declared that they are vexed, and that she should not be "forced upon" English Literature students therefore eliciting a response to banning her. And so, it can therefore be concluded, that because she is not controversial, she is controversial and should be banned. 8. Underlying themes are pursuant throughout all of Austen's works. Human fallacies of disillusionment, unrequited love, and betrayal are just some of these. But if one looks closely, one is sure to find many more apparent within. 9. Austen also had substantial influence with social and political issues as a direct result of her writing. She wrote about problems that were a result of unfair laws and customs. They dealt a lot with women's rights. They were specifically problems with women inheriting money, women finding and having ways to make livings, neglect of education, social evaluations of worthiness based on wealth or income, and so on. She was one of the first authors to write on these matters in a clear and succinct form, so as to have an influence on other authors and persons of importance. You will find more on this opinion here:My thoughts on Austen's writings and the movies made relating to her worksThe following are my reviews on each of the books listed in this novel:Mansfield ParkNorthanger AbbeyEmmaPersuasionPride & PrejudiceSense & Sensibility

  • Karen
    2018-10-12 22:28

    After checking out the other Kindle book collections that feature the writings of Jane Austen, I decided on this one because of three important things: 1. the cover grabbed me (really pretty and befitting of the era), 2. the layout was GREAT compared to the other Kindle versions I saw, where paragraphs were spaced weird and jagged on the right edge in some cases (or available illustrations were too small to even consider). The layout in this version makes for easy, comfortable reading, and the linked table of contents helps you to get around to the various books, and I just bookmark the chapters I like to reread or left off at. There are also beautiful title pages that precede each book, which is neat. 3. The price is right. For under $3.00 you get all of Austen's important and minor writings, including unfinished ones that have only recently come back into print. In short, while there are cheaper Kindle books of Jane Austen's works, this is a great Kindle book for the price, and the elegant layout really does make a difference. Well worth the purchase!

  • Steve
    2018-09-23 20:24

    This may not be a "mans" book, but it is a good read. There was a little too much chattiness for my liking at times, but the story resonates with me as it resembles (fondly) my courtship with my wife. I see myself in Mr. Darcy (prideful and not outgoing), and something of my wife in Lizzy (opinionated and strong (and strong headed).

  • La Mala ✌
    2018-10-21 01:43

    Otro regalo. Otro que va a llevar tiempito... XD

  • Kevin Ryan
    2018-09-22 01:17

    Finished Northanger Abbey in this collection. First Jane Austen book that I have read. Now want to read more by her.

  • Arlene Starr
    2018-10-05 21:41

    Northhampton AbbeyThis is a love novel, written in third person by Jane Austen and finished in 1803 but not published for several years. It is about a young lady Catherine Morland who takes leave of her parents and siblings to vacation with a neighboring couple, the Allens, in Bath an area recommended for Mr. Allen's health. Catherine is an inquisitive, adventurous, and imaginative girl who is entering young adulthood and eager to experience the opportunities which would be available to her in a place like Bath. She also had a passion for wanting to explore large edifices, such as castles and abbeys and learn of the mysteries found within their history. The story deals with her relationship with several people she meets in Bath; a young lady, Eleanor and her brother Henry; Ezabella and her brother John, and several other people who add spirit and interest to this story.It deals with friendship, courtships, misunderstandings, love, and pride and prejudice. The storybegins at a slow pace without much interest, but builds into an interesting and at times mysterious and compelling story.

  • Elsa
    2018-10-03 01:28

    All of her works are worth the read, thorough study, and so rich in wonderful characters, history, and self-discovery. Her protagonists have been some of the most interesting, clever, and beloved characters. Favorites in order:1. By far - PERSUASION. Anne Elliot is almost too good a character. First and last daughter of our's named mostly for her.2. Pride and Prejudice3. Emma4. Sense and Sensibility5. Northanger Abbey6. Mansfield Park

  • Natalie
    2018-09-24 22:22

    Ughh.. so many words to say so little. I just can not appreciate Jane Austin stories. I have tried several times and could not get through even one. I gave up. I hardly ever give up. That is how much i cannot appreciate Jane Austin.

  • Fadia Khan
    2018-10-01 19:37

    love this book!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! awwwwwwsome!! jane austin is the best author in the world!!!!!

  • Therese
    2018-09-20 00:17

    I have read all her books just wanted to get a digital copy to carry around with me in case of emergency!

  • Susan Phipps-harris
    2018-10-15 23:31

    I love her many written arts. I love her stories and the strong women, for those days, she portrays in her work.

  • Carmen
    2018-09-27 19:39

    One of my favorite writers. Pride and Prejudice the very first book in English I read in my life.

  • Paul
    2018-09-30 20:43

    I loved readingher books!

  • Dr.J.G.
    2018-10-13 00:42

    Sense and SensibilityThis one gives the clash of values characteristic of the writer, with wealth and temptation and opportunity versus rectitude and character and propriety as well as prudence playing the major part. How love itself must give way to rectitude and character is the chief theme, with the obvious lesson that giving way to temptation for now might close the door to happiness, love and future in fact.............................................Pride and Prejudice"It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." So the writer states right in the beginning. That is because while this is assumed to be a romance it is really a very astute picture of society that transcends time and geography and social boundaries and cultures, and applies universally to any place where there are young women at an age ripe to marry without dowries to bring out grooms out of the woods swarming. This is all the more so when the young women in question are not about to while away time with pretense of careers and attempts at education while the men they school and party with are getting ready, or any other subterfuges of societies they belong to. Marriage is the beginning of the life they are going to lead with homemaking and child rearing and building of social fabric and of future as their occupation, since time immemorial. It can be said to be the most important occupation in the world, and yet few societies make a provision of how the young women can go about securing their life in it, with few structures and storngholds and little if any security. Jane Austen writes extensively about this in various settings in her works, and offers much light to guide people - not only young women but men and women of all ages - with good counsel. This is her most popular work and most famous one, and with good reason. It seems like a romance and at some level it is but only after normal intelligent and prudent women - young and old - use decorum and wise counsel added to commonsense. This like other books by the author is about how to live well and safe and be good and decent, sensible and honourable, prudent and not blinded by illusions, and find love and romance and marriage as well. Often people of a bit less comprehension are likely to make the mistake of a common sort, where they conclude "Elizabeth married Darcy not out of love, but for his money". She - the writer - herself makes a joke of the sort, somewhere along towards the end, but it is clearly a joke for all that. Elizabeth might not have been sighing and fainting with passionate abandon at first sight, but that is because unlike figures of trashy pulp she is a person with a mind and other concerns as well, and for a normal young woman passion does not necessarily come as the blinding flash at first sight any more than it does for - say - a writer or a poet or an artist or a scientist. Which does not reduce the final outcome of a certainty when it does come. Elizabeth married for her conviction of love, respect and rectitude, not for money. If that were to be true she would not have refused him, or indeed even been off hand, and not fawning or manipulative, even before with all his standoffish behaviour. But she behaved normally, and refused him with a growing wrath when he proposed - it was not his money, but to begin with the truth of his letter, and then the regard his household had for him, the people who knew him the most, and subsequently his more than civil behaviour towards her relatives who were only middle class, and his obvious attempts to have his sister know her and have her for a friend - these wer the successive steps that changed her more and more. The final clinching one was of course his taking all the trouble to make amends to the grievous injury caused to her family by his silence, about someone he should have and did not warn people about, and keeping not only silent about it - the efforts he made to make sure about making amends to the injury caused by his reticence - but making sure her uncle would not tell anyone either. In between was his aunt arriving haughtily to obtain a reassuarance from her to the effect that she would not marry him - which not only made her stubborn but made the three concerned (the two and the aunt) realise that she might be considering it seriously, although his offer had not been left on the table indefinitely. So if anyone out there still thinks Elizabeth married him for his money - I suppose you did not read the story, really. .......................................Mansfield Park:- The writer of the universally popular Pride And Prejudice explores another angle of the conflicts of dealing with life as it is dealt out - wealth and relative status, temptation and opportunities, family and relationships, extended family and relatives, and love that never might be attained. Above all are rectitude and character and values, to be never lost whatever the temptation. .......................................Emma Perhaps arguably the second most popular of the writer's works vying with Mansfield Park for the title, this one again explores values and conflicts from another angle, with growth of character and perception, and temptation to meddle in social affairs, as the chief theme.It is more serious than it looks, as is usual with a good deal of her work, where the seemingly most superficial and romantic turns out to be most serious and worthy of note.More people than would care to acknowledge or admit even to themselves do meddle in affairs of others, especially those of heart, with a fond illusion that they can do good to others and provide their happiness for them. But lacking in perception and maturity and judgement and discrimination they often spoil more than they would like to admit, often ruining lives.Couples that might change the world with their love are torn asunder by a disapproving bunch of relatives or even religious heads with their "concern" for the "soul" of the one who might bring wonderious gifts but is not one of them (hence the gifts of course), and the miracle that would have been the families and souls generated with such love are nipped in the bud. Of course, it is only the couple that knows the tremendous love and the pain and suffering of being torn asunder, while others merely go about congratulating one another for having averted an unsuitable match with an outsider.Of course, meddling is not limited to that - couples that could have changed the course of the universe with their love and their gifts combined often get torn apart by meddling others who delude themselves that they were acting in good faith for the betterment of society, and if it is clear they were tormenting a woman or a daughter, well that is what they are for - so they can learn to do the same to others in turn, if so lucky, and so goes the chain. Jackals manage to devour the marriage and the love and even the children on all but physical level. Meanwhile gifts of heaven go squandered into dust because the couples are either too weak to hold on to each other and to their heavenly gift of creation of a new world, or even worse, because one gets turned against another and hurts until the one hurt is no more, which is when the survivor might realise if lucky of what has been lost, even though it might be too late. Often such realisation awaits death of the one who hurt the other one into death.None of this happened in Emma - she was lucky, to have good counsel and love guarding her, and her weakness of character of meddling with others nipped in bud and her mistakes of perception corrected by someone wiser and stern about serious faults. She was lucky indeed........................................Northanger Abbey The not so well to do young woman is taken to a resort by comparatively well to do relatives and is invited by the master of the Northanger Abbey, the father of the young and eligible gentleman who has a mutual attracted to her and courting her, to stay with him and his family, under the impression the she is going to inherit the relatives' money. The character of this father, the rich owner of the home that is the title, unfolds, and there are confusion, test of virtue and character, and separations and misunderstandings. The young man however has excellent character and fortunately realises what is what, and love triumphs even without money. .......................................Persuasion:- The most gentle love story from Austen repertoire, with the usual cache of gentle women and men following a normal course of life for their day while falling into easy traps of faults or follies and realising their mistakes and generally rising above, with their counterpart of men and women of small follies or serious faults of character providing examples of how not to be or behave. Someone (name escapes me, having read this long ago, two decades or more) had once pointed out that in Austen nothing happens page after page and yet one reads it with great interest, and to that one might only add, time after time again and again with the interest not diminished at all. And the most interesting are those of her tales that have the gentlest of stories, characters, et al. .......................................The Watsons:- One wishes she had had time to write it up as she did others; here is an outline written in her green years. .......................................Sanditon This barely begins before it ends. One wishes Austen had lived long enough to finish these few and write some more books as well of course. .......................................Lady SusanIf one never knew anyone of this sort, one would think the character is entirely invented. At that it is not that uncommon to come across men who deal with their own children, especially daughters, this cruelly or worse, but they are excused or even pressured to be this cruel and admired for it in various cultures (not excepting west or US for that matter) while women are usually this cruel with children of other women, say a lover's wife or a sister in law. But the character therefore is entirely possible, especially in an era when a woman could only obtain wealth and consequence by marriages her own and her relatives'; and the only area she could use her mind however sharp was in fields related to intrigues of social sort, marriages, love affaires, and so on, especially gossip and vile gossip about other women. This unfortunately is what far too many women and even men use their minds for, even now, for sport and not for want of subjects that could use the sharp minds. Sometimes it is the heart of such a gossiper and mud thrower that is at fault seriously in that destroying another person is the pleasure, and use of mind and other facilities is merely a means. Lady Susan comes as a surprise therefore not because of the subject but the author who chose to write it, since Jane Austen usually is as clear as a sunny day in desert about virtues and vices, and condemning not only the latter but even faults of character that might seem only human today but do lead to follies or tragedies even today often enough unquestionably. Here Austen chooses the letter form prevalent in her time, and avoids commentary, except in letters of another character, giving equal voice to two opposite characters as it were. The story ends well as all Austen tales do to reward virtue, protect innocent and punish vice or folly only in measure. A window as always to her time, and informative in that as well. .......................................Love and Friendship Lesley Castle The History of England Collection of Letters Scraps

  • Dr.J.G.
    2018-10-02 22:18

    Sense and Sensibility:- This one gives the clash of values characteristic of the writer, with wealth and temptation and opportunity versus rectitude and character and propriety as well as prudence playing the major part. How love itself must give way to rectitude and character is the chief theme, with the obvious lesson that giving way to temptation for now might close the door to happiness, love and future in fact. ............................................................................Pride And Prejudice:- "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." So the writer states right in the beginning. That is because while this is assumed to be a romance it is really a very astute picture of society that transcends time and geography and social boundaries and cultures, and applies universally to any place where there are young women at an age ripe to marry without dowries to bring out grooms out of the woods swarming. This is all the more so when the young women in question are not about to while away time with pretense of careers and attempts at education while the men they school and party with are getting ready, or any other subterfuges of societies they belong to. Marriage is the beginning of the life they are going to lead with homemaking and child rearing and building of social fabric and of future as their occupation, since time immemorial. It can be said to be the most important occupation in the world, and yet few societies make a provision of how the young women can go about securing their life in it, with few structures and storngholds and little if any security. Jane Austen writes extensively about this in various settings in her works, and offers much light to guide people - not only young women but men and women of all ages - with good counsel. This is her most popular work and most famous one, and with good reason. It seems like a romance and at some level it is but only after normal intelligent and prudent women - young and old - use decorum and wise counsel added to commonsense. This like other books by the author is about how to live well and safe and be good and decent, sensible and honourable, prudent and not blinded by illusions, and find love and romance and marriage as well. Often people of a bit less comprehension are likely to make the mistake of a common sort, where they conclude "Elizabeth married Darcy not out of love, but for his money". She - the writer - herself makes a joke of the sort, somewhere along towards the end, but it is clearly a joke for all that. Elizabeth might not have been sighing and fainting with passionate abandon at first sight, but that is because unlike figures of trashy pulp she is a person with a mind and other concerns as well, and for a normal young woman passion does not necessarily come as the blinding flash at first sight any more than it does for - say - a writer or a poet or an artist or a scientist. Which does not reduce the final outcome of a certainty when it does come. Elizabeth married for her conviction of love, respect and rectitude, not for money. If that were to be true she would not have refused him, or indeed even been off hand, and not fawning or manipulative, even before with all his standoffish behaviour. But she behaved normally, and refused him with a growing wrath when he proposed - it was not his money, but to begin with the truth of his letter, and then the regard his household had for him, the people who knew him the most, and subsequently his more than civil behaviour towards her relatives who were only middle class, and his obvious attempts to have his sister know her and have her for a friend - these wer the successive steps that changed her more and more. The final clinching one was of course his taking all the trouble to make amends to the grievous injury caused to her family by his silence, about someone he should have and did not warn people about, and keeping not only silent about it - the efforts he made to make sure about making amends to the injury caused by his reticence - but making sure her uncle would not tell anyone either. In between was his aunt arriving haughtily to obtain a reassuarance from her to the effect that she would not marry him - which not only made her stubborn but made the three concerned (the two and the aunt) realise that she might be considering it seriously, although his offer had not been left on the table indefinitely. So if anyone out there still thinks Elizabeth married him for his money - I suppose you did not read the story, really............................................................................. Emma:- Perhaps arguably the second most popular of the writer's works vying with Mansfield Park for the title, this one again explores values and conflicts from another angle, with growth of character and perception, and temptation to meddle in social affairs, as the chief theme.It is more serious than it looks, as is usual with a good deal of her work, where the seemingly most superficial and romantic turns out to be most serious and worthy of note.More people than would care to acknowledge or admit even to themselves do meddle in affairs of others, especially those of heart, with a fond illusion that they can do good to others and provide their happiness for them. But lacking in perception and maturity and judgement and discrimination they often spoil more than they would like to admit, often ruining lives.Couples that might change the world with their love are torn asunder by a disapproving bunch of relatives or even religious heads with their "concern" for the "soul" of the one who might bring wonderious gifts but is not one of them (hence the gifts of course), and the miracle that would have been the families and souls generated with such love are nipped in the bud. Of course, it is only the couple that knows the tremendous love and the pain and suffering of being torn asunder, while others merely go about congratulating one another for having averted an unsuitable match with an outsider.Of course, meddling is not limited to that - couples that could have changed the course of the universe with their love and their gifts combined often get torn apart by meddling others who delude themselves that they were acting in good faith for the betterment of society, and if it is clear they were tormenting a woman or a daughter, well that is what they are for - so they can learn to do the same to others in turn, if so lucky, and so goes the chain. Jackals manage to devour the marriage and the love and even the children on all but physical level. Meanwhile gifts of heaven go squandered into dust because the couples are either too weak to hold on to each other and to their heavenly gift of creation of a new world, or even worse, because one gets turned against another and hurts until the one hurt is no more, which is when the survivor might realise if lucky of what has been lost, even though it might be too late. Often such realisation awaits death of the one who hurt the other one into death.None of this happened in Emma - she was lucky, to have good counsel and love guarding her, and her weakness of character of meddling with others nipped in bud and her mistakes of perception corrected by someone wiser and stern about serious faults. She was lucky indeed................................................Persuasion:-The most gentle love story from Austen repertoire, with the usual cache of gentle women and men following a normal course of life for their day while falling into easy traps of faults or follies and realising their mistakes and generally rising above, with their counterpart of men and women of small follies or serious faults of character providing examples of how not to be or behave. Someone (name escapes me, having read this long ago, two decades or more) had once pointed out that in Austen nothing happens page after page and yet one reads it with great interest, and to that one might only add, time after time again and again with the interest not diminished at all. And the most interesting are those of her tales that have the gentlest of stories, characters, et al. ................................................Mansfield Park:- The writer of the universally popular Pride And Prejudice explores another angle of the conflicts of dealing with life as it is dealt out - wealth and relative status, temptation and opportunities, family and relationships, extended family and relatives, and love that never might be attained. Above all are rectitude and character and values, to be never lost whatever the temptation. ..............................................Northanger Abbey:-The not so well to do young woman is taken to a resort by comparatively well to do relatives and is invited by the master of the Northanger Abbey, the father of the young and eligible gentleman who has a mutual attracted to her and courting her, to stay with him and his family, under the impression the she is going to inherit the relatives' money. The character of this father, the rich owner of the home that is the title, unfolds, and there are confusion, test of virtue and character, and separations and misunderstandings. The young man however has excellent character and fortunately realises what is what, and love triumphs even without money. ...............................................Love and Friendship:- ..............................................Lady Susan:-If one never knew anyone of this sort, one would think the character is entirely invented. At that it is not that uncommon to come across men who deal with their own children, especially daughters, this cruelly or worse, but they are excused or even pressured to be this cruel and admired for it in various cultures (not excepting west or US for that matter) while women are usually this cruel with children of other women, say a lover's wife or a sister in law. But the character therefore is entirely possible, especially in an era when a woman could only obtain wealth and consequence by marriages her own and her relatives'; and the only area she could use her mind however sharp was in fields related to intrigues of social sort, marriages, love affaires, and so on, especially gossip and vile gossip about other women. This unfortunately is what far too many women and even men use their minds for, even now, for sport and not for want of subjects that could use the sharp minds. Sometimes it is the heart of such a gossiper and mud thrower that is at fault seriously in that destroying another person is the pleasure, and use of mind and other facilities is merely a means. Lady Susan comes as a surprise therefore not because of the subject but the author who chose to write it, since Jane Austen usually is as clear as a sunny day in desert about virtues and vices, and condemning not only the latter but even faults of character that might seem only human today but do lead to follies or tragedies even today often enough unquestionably. Here Austen chooses the letter form prevalent in her time, and avoids commentary, except in letters of another character, giving equal voice to two opposite characters as it were. The story ends well as all Austen tales do to reward virtue, protect innocent and punish vice or folly only in measure. A window as always to her time, and informative in that as well. ..............................................................................................

  • Candace
    2018-10-02 21:21

    I am at a lose of words. Who doesn't love Jane Austen?

  • Maria
    2018-09-19 21:42

    I have thoroughly enjoyed each and every book from Jane Austen. They always feel like my best friend sharing the juiciest gossip with me, and I always feel very attached to the characters.For more of my reviews, please visit my blog!

  • Mari
    2018-10-19 02:47

    Dec 2 2017 - Read The Beautifull Cassandra, which is part of the Juvenilia Part 1 collection. Juvenilia is a collection of stories she wrote when she was very young. And boy oh boy does it show. This is clearly a story written by a child. I did not like it. 1 star.

  • Ajeeta Longjam
    2018-09-30 02:42

    Nothing compares to Ms. Austen! Nothing!

  • DeDe
    2018-10-12 21:25

    My favorite author, I re-read her books often. Persuasion is my current favorite, but all are clever and funny, with her particular style of poking fun of the society she was a part of.

  • Jo
    2018-10-04 18:43

    I read Persuasion

  • Janavi Held
    2018-10-16 21:38

    I think I've read Pride and Prejudice 30 times. 😊

  • Jessica Asher
    2018-10-09 18:41

    Great collection of Austen!

  • Manasvi
    2018-10-15 23:47

    Jane AustenPride and PrejudiceNew York: Book-of-the-Month Club, 1996476 pp. Part of a Six-Book Set978-2-7441-0614-9 People think, even in this technologically advanced day and age, that is impossible for anyone, especially the average person, to travel back in time to a previous point in history. However, if a reader picks up a copy of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, they will be immediately transferred to early 19th century England by the end of the first chapter. Of course, no matter how much they want to, the person will be completely unable to transfer their physical bodies back to this charming era; it will be their minds which are immersed in a world of intriguing society and vivid descriptions of fantastic scenery. Pride and Prejudice is an extraordinary novel filled with exquisite depictions of the scenery of 1800’s England and wonderful portrayals of all the quirks of the community in which the main characters spend most of their time. Austen’s book is made all the more impressive when she puts in magnificent descriptions of the places her characters visit throughout the course of the novel. When Elizabeth Bennet, the main character, goes to visit the estate of Mr. Darcy, who she has perceived as a prideful and disagreeable man, she is quite surprised by the beauty of his grounds. She describes, “It was a large, handsome stone building, standing well on rising ground, and backed by a ridge of high woody hills." Elizabeth goes on to describe the surrounding woods by saying, “and the valley, here contracted into a glen, allowed room only for the stream, and narrow walk amidst the rough coppice-wood which bordered it." Austen cleverly makes sure to describe every piece of the picture so readers 200 years later know exactly what she is talking about and can visualize themselves exactly in the same piece of land. Another strong point of Austen’s classic which makes an extremely entertaining read is its ability to poke fun at the capricious society of the 20th century British genteel class. When Elizabeth tells her mother that she has been engaged to Mr. Darcy, who has a gigantic sum of ten thousand pounds coming to him each year, Mrs. Bennet, who had also always considered him to be an extremely disagreeable man, undergoes a complete change of heart and says, “Oh, my dear Lizzy! Pray apologize for my having disliked him so much before. I hope he will overlook it.” She even states, “But, my dearest love, tell me what dish Mr. Darcy is particularly fond of, that I may have it tomorrow." Austen portrays how people of that time will force themselves to like a person and change their opinions of him/her simply because he/she would be an important connection.Pride and Prejudice is extremely enjoyable because it is able to take anyone back into the magical time of the early 1800’s and give them a beautiful story helped along by rich portraits of the marvelous countryside and humorous portrayals of the customs of the fickle high social class. It is well worth a read by readers who wish to experience a wonderful tale in their minds without having to move anything more than his/her fingers and eyes. Take that, physics.

  • Ginna Kaiser
    2018-10-01 21:23

    Pride & Prejudice (1813)- Reread- Finished Rereading 2015- 09.29To Read Minor Works, Unfinished Works, Early Works:-Unfinished Works -The Watsons (1804) -Sandition (1817)-Minor Work -Lady Susan (1794, 1805)-Early Works -Love and Friendship -Lesley Castle -The History of England - Collection of Letters - ScrapsRead Major Works:-Emma (1815)-Sense & Sensibility (1813)-Mansfield Park (1814-Persuasion (1817) Posthumous (Each above Completed all at my leisure -amongst others.-) -Northanger Abbey (1817) Posthumous (Completed 2016- 06.08 and added to 2016 Reading List)

  • H.
    2018-09-22 22:46

    It is hard for me to sit and read this book because the typeset is so small...seems to be taking forever to read it. It also doesn't help that I keep having bits of the movie(s) flash in my mind as I read it and almost like the movies much better than the books.I've decided to skip Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice and come back to them later. The others I have not seen a movie about it hundreds of times, so maybe that will help me move through it quicker...the typeset is still very small....

  • Erin Bell
    2018-10-10 02:47

    So far, I'm enjoying this edition. I've completed Sense and Sensibility, and it was quite a good read. But I didn't expect less of Austen.My only issue, and the reason I'm not giving it a higher rating, is that the Kindle edition I'm reading has many many typos. On the one hand, what do you expect for $0.99? On the other hand, it's very distracting, and occasionally whole portions of sentences are lost. I'd recommend splurging on a better edition if you can, but this is otherwise a fine way to get into Austen's works.

  • Meghan
    2018-10-15 02:31

    i love everything that jane austen has ever written, and that is the absolute truth. her lead characters are strong, self-aware, passionate and loving, but still affected by the pettiness, selfishness, and social pressure that they are surrounded by. The exquisite detail in each of her novels transports you to a different time and place, and lets you believe that you are either an innocent onlooker or close family friend throughout the stories. These are stories that i go back to again and again.